Answering Your Most

Frequently Asked Questions

Find solutions to your most pressing OB-GYN inquiries in our comprehensive FAQ section.

obstetrics pregnancy ultrasound

Obstetrics

Do you offer trial of labor after Cesarean (TOLAC)/vaginal birth after Cesarean (VBAC)?
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In general, we do not offer TOLAC to patients who have had a prior Cesarean. Instead, we recommend repeat Cesarean delivery. However, exceptions may be made if a patient has had prior successful VBACs before. Talk to your doctor to see if you qualify.

When should I go to labor and delivery?
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In general, pregnant patients should go to labor and delivery if they are over 20 weeks pregnant and suspect their water has broken (leaking fluid), significant vaginal bleeding (like a period or heavier), are experiencing contractions every 10 minutes or more frequently for at least an hour, or experience decreased fetal movement.

How often do I need an ultrasound during pregnancy?
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All patients should get at least two ultrasounds during the pregnancy - one to confirm or establish the due date at or soon after your first visit, and a formal anatomy scan around 20 weeks (done off-site) to check all the baby’s body parts and make sure there are no detectable birth defects. Depending on risk factors, a pregnancy may require more ultrasound scans to check for growth or to follow up on previous abnormal findings, but many low-risk patients do not need this.

I’m pregnant! How soon after I find out do I need to have an appointment?
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Your first OB visit should be about 7 to 10 weeks after the first day of your last menstrual period, as that is the earliest that a heartbeat can be reliably detected on ultrasound.

What tests are necessary during pregnancy according to Dr. Tran?
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While it's important to know that all screening tests are optional, Dr. Tran strongly suggests considering them within specific timeframes. These tests include:

What is the timing for Dr. Tran to conduct a repeat cesarean section?
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Dr. Tran usually aims to schedule a repeat cesarean section about a week before your confirmed due date, but if any medical complications arise or you happen to go into labor earlier, she may need to adjust the timing.

Do we offer Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Section (VBAC)?
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Dr. Tran is happy to discuss the option of a VBAC (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean) with those who are interested. Just remember to bring along your medical records from your previous cesarean section if Dr. Tran wasn't the one who delivered your baby.

diverse and varying contraceptive methods: birth control, patch, iud, ring and more

Contraceptives

Do you offer abortion services?
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We do not offer elective (not medically necessary) abortion services. We refer patients to Planned Parenthood for their abortion care needs.

Which contraceptive options are safe for smokers?
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In general, any contraceptive option without estrogen in it is safe for smokers. This includes IUDs, implants, injections, and progesterone-only birth control. For smokers less than 35 years of age, all the other contraceptive options that do contain estrogen are probably overall safe, but in general progesterone-only methods are safer and preferred.

Which contraceptive options are safe for breastfeeding?
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All types of contraception are safe for breastfeeding, although estrogen-containing options may decrease your milk supply especially if not well established. Estrogen-containing options include combination birth control pills, patches, and vaginal rings.

How can I prepare for my IUD insertion and what should I expect after?
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If possible, schedule your IUD insertion during your period, as the cervix will already be slightly open during that time. To reduce cramping immediately after the insertion, we recommend taking 600mg ibuprofen or 1000mg acetaminophen before coming to your appointment.

What kinds of contraception do you offer?
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We offer a range of contraceptive care including birth control pills progesterone-only pills, patches, vaginal rings, injections, implants, hormonal as well as hormone-free intrauterine devices (IUDs), and female sterilization (surgery to “tie your tubes”).

What is the most effective contraceptive method for preventing pregnancy?
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The most effective contraceptive method for preventing pregnancy is typically the intrauterine device (IUD), particularly the hormonal IUD or the copper IUD. These devices have a very low failure rate and provide long-term protection, ranging from 3 to 10 years, depending on the type. Of course, it's essential to discuss your contraceptive options with a healthcare provider to determine the best choice for your specific needs and preferences.

What's the optimal time for IUD insertion?
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A good time to consider having an IUD inserted is during the 4th or 5th day of your period. This timing helps ensure that you're not pregnant during the insertion and that your cervix is slightly open, which can make the process less uncomfortable. If you're currently using another birth control method or breastfeeding, you have some flexibility in when you can schedule the insertion.

caring for hpv

Abnormal Pap / HPV

Do I need the HPV vaccine?
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The HPV vaccine is routinely recommended for girls and boys aged 11-12. If you have not received the vaccine yet and are 13-26, it is recommended that catch-up vaccination be done. For individuals aged 27-42, HPV vaccination may be considered but as HPV is very common in the general population, the chances of a patient already having been exposed to HPV by age 26 is quite high and therefore older individuals may not benefit as much from the vaccine as younger individuals.

How often do I need a Pap smear?
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According to the current ASCCP guidelines, Pap smears should be done every 3 years for women ages 21-30, and may be spaced to every 5 years for women greater than age 30 if HPV co-testing is done. This is assuming all testing is normal/negative.

What is HPV?
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Human papillomavirus, or HPV, is a sexually transmitted virus that causes about 99.7% of cervical cancers. There are many high-risk and low-risk types, but in general the high-risk types are ones that can cause cervical cancer, and the low risk types are one that can cause genital warts. HPV is extremely common in the general population, is usually successfully removed by one’s own immune system, and there is no medication treatment for it - therefore is not routinely checked as part of STI screening. High-risk types, however, are checked for during Pap smear cervical cancer screening for some individuals.

What is a Pap smear and how is it different than a pelvic examination?
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A Pap smear is a specific test done during a pelvic examination, where a brushing of cells is taken from the cervix to check for cervical cancer or pre-cancer. Sometimes, the Pap smear may also check for presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) - also known as HPV co-testing.

What is Colposcopy?
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If you have an HPV infection or an abnormal PAP result, Dr. Tran might suggest this procedure. It's basically a close look at the cervix under a microscope to assess its condition and take some samples.

What is Cryotherapy?
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Cryotherapy involves applying cold liquid nitrogen to the cervix to treat a mild cervical HPV infection. The procedure typically lasts around 4 to 8 minutes. Afterward, you may experience cramps for a couple of days and a mucus discharge that can last up to 4-6 weeks. It's advisable to abstain from intercourse for about 3 to 4 weeks during the recovery period.

all things laparoscopy surgery and recovery

Laparoscopy

What is the recovery time and post-op care after a major laparoscopy procedure?
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In most cases, you'll be heading home from the hospital the day after your surgery. Once you're back home, it's a good idea to:

How do I prepare for a laparoscopy procedure?
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Before the procedure, please make sure to follow these instructions:

female obgyn women's health doctor

Other

I got my period. Do I need to reschedule my appointment?
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You only need to reschedule your appointment if you are expecting to get a Pap smear (e.g. at some annual exams) and your flow is moderate to heavy since blood can interfere with the Pap specimen.

What is the difference between obstetrics (OB) and gynecology (GYN)?
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Obstetrics is the medical and surgical care surrounding pregnancy. Gynecology is the medical and surgical care for female pelvic organs when it is not pregnancy-related. We provide both obstetrical and gynecology services including but not limited to well-woman exams, abnormal bleeding, fibroids, Pap smears and abnormal Pap smears, menopause, ovarian cysts, birth control, sexual disorders, pelvic pain, vaginal infections and urinary tract infections, initial breast disorder evaluation, and more.

What insurances do you accept?
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We accept all PPOs, Physicians Medical Group HMO, Medicare, and NCPN Medicare.

I got my period. Do I need to reschedule my appointment?
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You only need to reschedule your appointment if you are expecting to get a Pap smear (e.g. at some annual exams) and your flow is moderate to heavy, since blood can interfere with the Pap specimen.

What is Endometrial Biopsy (EMB)?
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This procedure is done right in the office and is super quick, usually taking just 10-20 seconds. Its purpose is to collect some tissue from the uterus to make sure there's no sign of uterine cancer. If you're worried about pain, you can take pain meds like Motrin before the procedure to help.